Back to School & learning

Bibs & bobs — 2 December 2019

By Mums At The Table 1 min read

Sick of buying presents for Christmas? This may help | Why you should be concerned about your kids' Instagram use | Your child's primary school plays no part in determining their desire for higher education. But this does

Sick of buying presents for Christmas? This may help

The Adventist Development and Relief Agency Australia (ADRA Australia) has launched a Christmas appeal to encourage people to help make a meaningful difference this Christmas. If the commercialisation or hustle and bustle of Christmas shopping has gotten the better of you, you can relax in the comfort of your own home and purchase a gift from the ADRA Australia gift catalogue, designed to give a family in need the chance at a better life. Gifts include school lunches ($5), beehives ($55) and a baby goat ($100).—ADRA Australia

Why you should be concerned about your kids' Instagram use 

Three anti-sexual exploitation organisations from three countries—Collective Shout (Australia), the National Center on Sexual Exploitation (United States) and Defend Dignity (Canada)—have launched #WakeUpInstagram, a campaign to call out rampant sex trafficking, child sexual abuse grooming and the fetishisation of underage girls on Instagram. "Instagram’s picture-based platform makes it a haven for predators to groom and sexually exploit minors," Defend Dignity director Glendyne Gerrard said.
Collective Shout

Your child's primary school plays no part in determining their desire for higher education. But this does

new study shows that the primary school a child attends, including school and class size, grade point average of the school and property prices, has almost no influence on their desire to progress to higher education. Much more important are other factors, including parental aspirations, academic support from their mother and having a desk to work on. Girls are also more likely than boys to want to continue to higher education. And while school-level factors didn't have any influence, performance at school did: high academic grades were the single strongest predictor of a pupil's desire to continue to higher education, while enjoying school was also an important factor.Educational Studies