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Bibs & bobs — 28 October 2019

By Mums At The Table 1 min read

Learning to speak? There's an order to teaching it right | Want to keep track of your child? Try using this | This is why dads are often happier, less stressed and less tired than mums when taking care of kids

Learning to speak? There's an order to teaching it right

A new study could hold the key to learning languages, teaching children colours or even studying complex theories. The results of the study indicate that children who see objects first and then hear the name—object-label learners—process inconsistent information better than learners who hear the name first and then see the object. “From this research, we can say that the order of presentation actually matters and that seeing the object first creates a stronger association to the name,” said Timmy Ma, who conducted the research while a PhD candidate at the University of California, USA. —Cognitive Science

Want to keep track of your child? Try using this

Designed with children in mind, TicTocTrack is a smartwatch that enables you to keep track of your child’s location via GPS. You can even set up safe areas and receive SMS notifications when your child enters or leaves them. The touchscreen allows them to select up to six linked numbers to call from the watch. Available in Australia and New Zealand, the watch is also used by those with autism, dementia and the vision impaired, and is covered by the Australian NDIS.

This is why dads are often happier, less stressed and less tired than mums when taking care of kids

Researchers have found that fathers' childcare activities were more likely to be recreational and take place on the weekend, while mothers' activities were more likely to involve an infant and fit into the category of "solo parenting," that is, parenting without a partner present. Researchers found that taking the context of childcare activities into account fully explained differences in mother and father happiness, and partially explained differences in stress. It did not however explain differences in tiredness. "Our findings show that some aspects of parenting are more enjoyable than others and that the way childcare is distributed between mothers and fathers right now brings more emotional rewards for dads than for moms," says Cadhla McDonnell, a doctoral candidate in sociology and demography at Penn State. "But it's impossible to say from our data whether this is the result of personal choices or whether it's a reaction to outside forces like job demands." —Science Daily